Deaf and hearing children's development of theory of mind, peer popularity, and leadership during middle childhood

Peterson, Candida C., O'Reilly, Karin and Wellman, Henry M. (2016) Deaf and hearing children's development of theory of mind, peer popularity, and leadership during middle childhood. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 149 146-158. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2015.11.008


Author Peterson, Candida C.
O'Reilly, Karin
Wellman, Henry M.
Title Deaf and hearing children's development of theory of mind, peer popularity, and leadership during middle childhood
Journal name Journal of Experimental Child Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0965
1096-0457
Publication date 2016-09
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jecp.2015.11.008
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 149
Start page 146
End page 158
Total pages 13
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract This study had two primary aims. First, we compared deaf and hearing children during middle and late childhood on (a) cognitive understanding of basic and advanced theory of mind (ToM) and (b) social dimensions of peer group relations, including popularity, isolation, leadership, and the disposition to interact positively with peers. Second, using correlational analyses, we examined ToM's connections with these social variables to see whether and how ToM impacts children's social lives. A total of 57 children (36 deaf children of hearing parents and 21 hearing children) 6 to 14 years of age completed a 6-step developmental ToM Scale, and their teachers reported on the social variables. Hearing children outperformed deaf children on ToM and all teacher-rated variables. For deaf children, popularity correlated positively, and social isolation correlated negatively, with ToM even after controlling for age, gender, and language ability. For hearing children, the only ToM link was a weak correlation with leadership. Possible reasons for the differences between deaf and hearing groups are discussed, together with the likelihood of bidirectional causal links and implications for deaf children's social development in school.
Keyword Atypical development
Leadership
Middle childhood
Peers
Popularity
Theory of mind
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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