Effect of birth weight on adulthood renal function: a bias-adjusted meta-analytic approach

Das, Sumon Kumar, Mannan, Munim, Faruque, Abu Syed Golam, Ahmed, Tahmeed, McIntyre, Harold David and Al Mamun, Abdullah (2016) Effect of birth weight on adulthood renal function: a bias-adjusted meta-analytic approach. Nephrology, 21 7: 547-565. doi:10.1111/nep.12732


Author Das, Sumon Kumar
Mannan, Munim
Faruque, Abu Syed Golam
Ahmed, Tahmeed
McIntyre, Harold David
Al Mamun, Abdullah
Title Effect of birth weight on adulthood renal function: a bias-adjusted meta-analytic approach
Journal name Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1797
1320-5358
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/nep.12732
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 21
Issue 7
Start page 547
End page 565
Total pages 19
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
While the association between low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g) and development of adult chronic renal disease (CKD) is inconsistently reported, less information is available regarding association of high birth weight (HBW; ≥4000 g) with CKD. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on studies published before 30 September 2015 and report associations between birth weight and renal function. Blood (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) and urine (microalbuminuria/albumin excreation rate (AER)/urinary albumin creatinine ratio (ACR)) parameters were used to define CKD. Three different effect size estimates were used (odds ratio, regression coefficient and mean difference). The odds of developing CKD in the life course among those born LBW was 1.77 (95% CI: 1.42, 2.20) times and 1.68 (1.27, 2.33) times, assessed by blood and urine parameters respectively. Higher risk was also observed among Asian and Australian populations (blood: OR 2.68; urine: OR 2.28), individuals aged ≤30 years (blood: OR 2.30; urine: OR 1.26), and ≥50 years (blood: OR 3.66; urine: OR 3.10), people with diabetes (blood: OR 2.51), and aborigines (urine: OR 2.32). There was no significant association between HBW and CKD. For every 1 kg increase in BW, the estimated GFR increased by 2.09 mL/min per 1.73 m2 (1.33–2.85), and it was negatively associated with LogACR (ß −0.07, 95% CI: −0.14, 0.00). LBW inborn had lower mean GFR −4.62 (−7.10, −2.14) compared with normal BW. Findings of this study suggest that LBW increased the risk of developing CKD, and HBW did not show any significant impact.
Keyword Birth weight
Meta-analysis
Renal function
Systematic review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 07 Aug 2016, 00:16:10 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)