Use of molecular technologies for the advancement of animal breeding: Genomic selection in dairy cattle populations in Australia, Ireland and New Zealand

Spelman, Richard J., Hayes, Ben J. and Berry, Donagh P. (2013). Use of molecular technologies for the advancement of animal breeding: Genomic selection in dairy cattle populations in Australia, Ireland and New Zealand. In: , , (869-875). . doi:10.1071/AN12304


Author Spelman, Richard J.
Hayes, Ben J.
Berry, Donagh P.
Title of paper Use of molecular technologies for the advancement of animal breeding: Genomic selection in dairy cattle populations in Australia, Ireland and New Zealand
Journal name Animal Production Science   Check publisher's open access policy
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1071/AN12304
ISSN 1836-0939
Volume 53
Issue 9
Start page 869
End page 875
Total pages 7
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The New Zealand, Australian and Irish dairy industries have used genomic information to enhance their genetic evaluations over the last 2-4 years. The improvement in the accuracy obtained from including genomic information on thousands of animals in the national evaluation system has revolutionised the dairy breeding programs in the three countries. The genomically enhanced breeding values (GEBV) of young bulls are more reliable than breeding values based on parent average, thus allowing the young bulls to be reliably selected and used in the national herd. Traditionally, the use of young bulls was limited and bulls were not used extensively until they were 5 years old when the more reliable progeny test results became available. Using young sires, as opposed to progeny-tested sires, in the breeding program dramatically reduces the generation interval, thereby facilitating an increase in the rate of genetic gain by 40-50%. Young sires have been marketed on their GEBV in the three countries over the last 2-4 years. Initial results show that the genomic estimates were overestimated in both New Zealand and Ireland. Adjustments have since been introduced into their respective national evaluations to reduce the bias. A bias adjustment has been included in the Australian evaluation since it began; however, official genomic evaluations have not been in place as long as in New Zealand and Ireland, so there has been less opportunity to validate if the correction accounts for all bias. Sequencing of the dairy cattle population has commenced in an effort to further improve the genomic predictions and also to detect causative mutations that underlie traits of economic performance.
Subjects 1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
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