2016 Patellofemoral pain consensus statement from the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Manchester. Part 1: terminology, definitions, clinical examination, natural history, patellofemoral osteoarthritis and patient-reported outcome m

Crossley, Kay M., Stefanik, Joshua J., Selfe, James, Collins, Natalie J., Davis, Irene S., Powers, Christopher M., McConnell, Jenny, Vicenzino, Bill, Bazett-Jones, David M., Esculier, Jean-Francois, Morrissey, Dylan and Callaghan, Michael J. (2016) 2016 Patellofemoral pain consensus statement from the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Manchester. Part 1: terminology, definitions, clinical examination, natural history, patellofemoral osteoarthritis and patient-reported outcome measures. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 14: 839-843. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096384


Author Crossley, Kay M.
Stefanik, Joshua J.
Selfe, James
Collins, Natalie J.
Davis, Irene S.
Powers, Christopher M.
McConnell, Jenny
Vicenzino, Bill
Bazett-Jones, David M.
Esculier, Jean-Francois
Morrissey, Dylan
Callaghan, Michael J.
Title 2016 Patellofemoral pain consensus statement from the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat, Manchester. Part 1: terminology, definitions, clinical examination, natural history, patellofemoral osteoarthritis and patient-reported outcome measures
Journal name British Journal of Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-0480
0306-3674
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096384
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 50
Issue 14
Start page 839
End page 843
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Patellofemoral pain (PFP) typically presents as diffuse anterior knee pain, usually with activities such as squatting, running, stair ascent and descent. It is common in active individuals across the lifespan,1–4 and is a frequent cause for presentation at physiotherapy, general practice, orthopaedic and sports medicine clinics in particular.5 ,6 Its impact is profound, often reducing the ability of those with PFP to perform sporting, physical activity and work-related activities pain-free. Increasing evidence suggests that it is a recalcitrant condition, persisting for many years.7–9 In an attempt to share recent innovations, build on the first three successful biennial retreats and define the ‘state of the art’ for this common, impactful condition; the 4th International Patellofemoral Pain Research Retreat was convened.

The 4th International Patellofemoral Research Retreat was held in Manchester, UK, over 3 days (September 2–4th, 2015). After undergoing peer-review for scientific merit and relevance to the retreat, 67 abstracts were accepted for the retreat (50 podium presentations, and 17 short presentations). The podium and short presentations were grouped into five categories; (1) PFP, (2) factors that influence PFP (3) the trunk and lower extremity (4) interventions and (5) systematic analyses. Three keynote speakers were chosen for their scientific contribution in the area of PFP. Professor Andrew Amis spoke on the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint. Professor David Felson spoke on patellofemoral arthritis,10 and Dr Michael Ratleff's keynote theme was PFP in the adolescent patient.11 As part of the retreat, we held structured, whole-group discussions in order to develop consensus relating to the work presented at the meeting as well as evidence gathered from the literature.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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