The effect of 1 mg folic acid supplementation on clinical outcomes in female migraine with aura patients

Menon, Saras, Nasir, Bushra, Avgan, Nesli, Ghassabian, Sussan, Oliver, Christopher, Lea, Rodney, Smith, Maree and Griffiths, Lyn (2016) The effect of 1 mg folic acid supplementation on clinical outcomes in female migraine with aura patients. Journal of Headache and Pain, 17 . doi:10.1186/s10194-016-0652-7


Author Menon, Saras
Nasir, Bushra
Avgan, Nesli
Ghassabian, Sussan
Oliver, Christopher
Lea, Rodney
Smith, Maree
Griffiths, Lyn
Title The effect of 1 mg folic acid supplementation on clinical outcomes in female migraine with aura patients
Journal name Journal of Headache and Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1129-2377
1129-2369
Publication date 2016-06-23
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s10194-016-0652-7
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 17
Total pages 7
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher SpringerOpen
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Migraine is a common neurovascular condition that may be linked to hyperhomocysteinemia. We have previously provided evidence that reduction of homocysteine with a vitamin supplementation can reduce the occurrence of migraine in women. The current study examined the occurrence of migraine in response to vitamin supplementation with a lower dose of folic acid.

Methods: This was a 6 month randomised, double blinded placebo controlled trial of daily vitamin supplementation containing 1 mg of folic acid, 25 mg of Vitamin B6 and Vitamin B12, on reduction of homocysteine and the occurrence of migraine in 300 female patients diagnosed with migraine with aura.

Results: Vitamin supplementation with 1 mg of folic acid, did not significantly decrease homocysteine levels (P = 0.2). The treatment group did not show a significant decrease in the percentage of participants with high migraine disability, severity or frequency at the end of the 6 month intervention (P > 0.1).

Conclusion: 1 mg of folic acid in combination with vitamin B6 and B12 is less effective in reducing migraine associated symptoms compared to the previously tested dosage of 2 mg folic acid in combination with 25 mg of vitamin B6 and 400 μg of vitamin B12.
Keyword Folate
Folic acid
Migraine
Vitamin B6
Vitamin B12
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Integrated Preclinical Drug Development Publications
 
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