Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in studying nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in skin and liver

Thorling, Camilla A., Holmes, Amy, Studier, Hauke, Liu, David, Liang, Xiaowen and Roberts, Michael S. (2016). Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in studying nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in skin and liver. In Stefan G. Stanciu (Ed.), Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in studying nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in skin and liver (pp. 107-123) Rijeka, Croatia: InTech. doi:10.5772/63452

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Author Thorling, Camilla A.
Holmes, Amy
Studier, Hauke
Liu, David
Liang, Xiaowen
Roberts, Michael S.
Title of chapter Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in studying nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in skin and liver
Title of book Multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in studying nanoparticle pharmacokinetics in skin and liver
Place of Publication Rijeka, Croatia
Publisher InTech
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.5772/63452
Open Access Status DOI
ISBN 9789535147220
Editor Stefan G. Stanciu
Chapter number 5
Start page 107
End page 123
Total pages 18
Total chapters 6
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The use of nanoparticles has increased in consumer products in recent decades; however, concerns regarding their safety remain. Zinc oxide is used in sunblocking and may generate free radicals in response to UV illumination, leading to DNA damage and an immunological response. With high‐resolution, high‐contrast imaging in biological tissue, multiphoton microscopy is able to separate nanoparticles signals from endogenous fluorophores. It has been proven to be very useful in imaging penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles in skin and in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy study cellular function as well. This chapter aims to review the use of these imaging techniques in studying the uptake and distribution of nanoparticles in skin and liver. Due to the questionable clinical use and possible toxicity of nanoparticles, it is important to study their pharmacokinetics. Some nanomaterials have been identified as relatively toxic to humans and a few metal nanoparticles have been reported to penetrate and be detected in blood. Multiphoton microscopy has high resolution and is able to visualize nanoparticles, due to their optical properties, in vivo. The addition of fluorescence lifetime imaging makes it possible to measure the physiochemical environment, with outputs that can be statistically analyzed, posing an advantage over fluorescence intensity imaging only.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 28 Jul 2016, 14:15:56 EST by Camilla Thompson on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital