Technology-enabled delivery and assessment methods: Are we addressing student expectations and learning preferences?

Tennent B., Becker K. and Kehoe J. (2005). Technology-enabled delivery and assessment methods: Are we addressing student expectations and learning preferences?. In: ASCILITE 2005 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education. 22nd Annual conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2005, Brisbane, QL, (649-659). December 4, 2005-December 7, 2005.

Author Tennent B.
Becker K.
Kehoe J.
Title of paper Technology-enabled delivery and assessment methods: Are we addressing student expectations and learning preferences?
Conference name 22nd Annual conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2005
Conference location Brisbane, QL
Conference dates December 4, 2005-December 7, 2005
Proceedings title ASCILITE 2005 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Journal name ASCILITE 2005 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Series ASCILITE 2005 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 649
End page 659
Total pages 11
Abstract/Summary The role and importance of technology in an educational environment is growing and changing at a rapid pace. This technology has the potential to address many deficiencies of more traditional educational models, but also has accompanying potential drawbacks. As educators, we are balancing on a daily basis, differing expectations of our students (particularly across the generations), changing societal norms in relation to the balancing of work/life and education, and the turbulent landscape of resource allocation and focus in the tertiary education sector. This study provides insights into student perceptions and expectations in three large, cross-discipline courses, each using different forms of technology-enabled delivery or assessment. In particular, the study considers individual students' learning styles and whether this impacts their preference for, or expectations and experiences of technology-enabled learning.
Subjects 1701 Psychology
1706 Computer Science Applications
1709 Human-Computer Interaction
3304 Education
Keyword Flexible delivery
Learning styles
Online assessment
Technology
Tertiary education
Web delivery
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2016, 05:16:09 EST by System User