The effect of compaction on the growth of pigeonpea on clay soils. II. Mechanisms of crop response and seasonal effects on an oxisol in a humid coastal environment

Kirkegaard J.A., Troedson R.J., So H.B. and Kushwaha B.L. (1992) The effect of compaction on the growth of pigeonpea on clay soils. II. Mechanisms of crop response and seasonal effects on an oxisol in a humid coastal environment. Soil and Tillage Research, 24 2: 129-147. doi:10.1016/0167-1987(92)90097-U


Author Kirkegaard J.A.
Troedson R.J.
So H.B.
Kushwaha B.L.
Title The effect of compaction on the growth of pigeonpea on clay soils. II. Mechanisms of crop response and seasonal effects on an oxisol in a humid coastal environment
Journal name Soil and Tillage Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-1987
Publication date 1992
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0167-1987(92)90097-U
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 129
End page 147
Total pages 19
Subject 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology
1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
1900 Earth and Planetary Sciences
2300 Environmental Science
Abstract Field experiments were conducted over two seasons (1986/1987 and 1987/1988) on a coastal oxisol to investigate the effects of soil compaction on the growth and seed yield of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan). Combinations of deep ripping and roller compaction were used to establish a range of compaction treatments. The effects of seasonal conditions on plant response to compaction were investigated using irrigation treatments and a rainout shelter to exclude rain during early growth. Despite some reduction on compacted soil, infiltration of water remained high on all treatments and compaction had no effect on subsoil water storage. Plant response was related to the ability of the root system to overcome the soil strength limitations of the compacted soil. The distribution of rainfall during the early growth period was critical in determining plant response. When rain or irrigation maintained low soil strength, compaction increased early shoot growth, presumably as a result of increased volumetric water and nutrient supply. In dry conditions, root penetration was restricted by high soil strength thus reducing water uptake and shoot growth. These early growth restrictions could be compensated by rain or irrigation during later growth stages. The accurate prediction of compaction effects on crop growth and yield requires a modelling framework which accounts for the temporal variability in soil strength, and its effect on root growth and water uptake by plants.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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