The effects of school-based lifestyle interventions on body mass index and blood pressure: a multivariate multilevel meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Oosterhoff, M., Joore, M. and Ferreira, I. (2016) The effects of school-based lifestyle interventions on body mass index and blood pressure: a multivariate multilevel meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Obesity Reviews, 17 11: 1131-1153. doi:10.1111/obr.12446


Author Oosterhoff, M.
Joore, M.
Ferreira, I.
Title The effects of school-based lifestyle interventions on body mass index and blood pressure: a multivariate multilevel meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Journal name Obesity Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1467-7881
1467-789X
Publication date 2016-11
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/obr.12446
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 11
Start page 1131
End page 1153
Total pages 23
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Primary prevention of childhood obesity and related hypertension is warrant given that both risk factors are intertwined and track into adulthood. This systematic review and meta-analysis assess the impact of school-based lifestyle interventions on children's body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. We searched databases and prior reviews. Eligibility criteria were the following: randomized controlled trial design, evaluation of a school-based intervention, targeting children aged 4–12 years, reporting on BMI and/or related cardiovascular risk factors, reporting data on at least one follow-up moment. The effects on BMI, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were evaluated by means of univariate and multivariate three-level random effects models. A total of 85 RCTs (91 papers) were included in the meta-analyses. In univariate models, the pooled effects were −0.072 (95%CI: −0.106; −0.038) for BMI, −0.183 (95%CI: −0.288; −0.078) for SBP and −0.071 (95%CI: −0.185; 0.044) for DBP. In multivariate analyses, the pooled effects of interventions were −0.054 (95%CI: −0.131; 0.022) for BMI, −0.182 (95%CI: −0.266; −0.098) for SBP and −0.144 (95%CI: −0.230; −0.057) for DBP. Parental involvement accentuated the beneficial effects of interventions. School-based lifestyle prevention interventions result in beneficial changes in children's BMI and blood pressure, and the effects on the latter may be stronger than and accrue independently from those in the former.
Keyword Childhood obesity and hypertension
Multivariate multilevel meta-analysis
School-based nterventions
Obesity
Blood pressure
Children
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Tue, 19 Jul 2016, 21:07:05 EST by Isabel Ferreira on behalf of School of Public Health