Divergent natural selection drives the evolution of extrinsic post zygotic isolation in an Australian wildflower

Richards, Thomas J., Walter, Gregory M., McGuigan, Katrina and Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel (2016) Divergent natural selection drives the evolution of extrinsic post zygotic isolation in an Australian wildflower. Evolution, . doi:10.1111/evo.12994.


Author Richards, Thomas J.
Walter, Gregory M.
McGuigan, Katrina
Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel
Title Divergent natural selection drives the evolution of extrinsic post zygotic isolation in an Australian wildflower
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1558-5646
0014-3820
Publication date 2016-06-29
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/evo.12994.
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 23
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Ecological speciation occurs when reproductive isolation evolves between populations adapting to contrasting environments. A key prediction of this process is that the fitness of hybrids between divergent populations should be reduced in each parental environment as a function of the proportion of local genes they carry, a process resulting in ecologically dependent reproductive isolation (RI). To test this prediction, we use reciprocal transplant experiments between adjacent populations of an Australian wildflower, Senecio lautus, at two locations to distinguish between ecologically dependent and intrinsic genetic reproductive barriers. These barriers can be distinguished by observing the relative fitness of reciprocal backcross hybrids, as they differ in the contribution of genes from either parent while controlling for any intrinsic fitness effects of hybridization. We show ecologically dependent fitness effects in establishment and survival of backcrosses in one transplant experiment, and growth performance in the second transplant experiment. These results suggests natural selection can create strong reproductive barriers that maintain differentiation between populations with the potential to interbreed, and implies a significant role for ecology in the evolutionary divergence of S. lautus.
Keyword Ecological speciation
Postzygotic isolation
Reciprocal transplant
MCMCglmm
Senecio
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 19 Jul 2016, 12:24:11 EST by Dr Daniel Ortiz-barrientos on behalf of School of Biological Sciences