Physical education’s grand convergence: Fitnessgram, big-data and the digital commerce of children’s bodies

Pluim, Carolyn and Gard, Michael (2016) Physical education’s grand convergence: Fitnessgram, big-data and the digital commerce of children’s bodies. Critical Studies in Education, 1-18. doi:10.1080/17508487.2016.1194303


Author Pluim, Carolyn
Gard, Michael
Title Physical education’s grand convergence: Fitnessgram, big-data and the digital commerce of children’s bodies
Formatted title
Physical education’s grand convergence: Fitnessgram®, big-data and the digital commerce of children’s bodies
Journal name Critical Studies in Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1750-8487
1750-8495
Publication date 2016-06-09
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17508487.2016.1194303
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Fitnessgram® is a digital platform designed to help physical education teachers measure, record, disseminate and analyse the results of school-based student fitness testing. Despite important questions about the ethics, educational value and costs of Fitnessgram®, it is now widely used in the United States and is spreading to other countries. In this empirically investigative study, we draw on academic studies and commentary, media stories, government and funding body reports, press releases and advertisements to describe the emergence of Fitnessgram® and the convergence of factors that appear to guarantee the programme’s increasing ubiquity. We also discuss the various ways the data sets built by Fitnessgram® may reshape the practice and purpose of physical education as well how young people understand their own health in light of this. In the face of puzzling academic silence on the Fitnessgram® phenomena, this paper stimulates lines of critical academic enquiry about the financial self-interest, educational shortcomings and policy implications that its rise suggests.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 13 Jul 2016, 13:49:04 EST by Michael Gard on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences