Ancient crops provide first archaeological signature of the westward Austronesian expansion

Crowther, Alison, Lucas, Leilani, Helm, Richard, Horton, Mark, Shipton, Ceri, Wright, Henry T., Walshaw, Sarah, Pawlowicz, Matthew, Radimilahy, Chantal, Douka, Katerina, Picornell-Gelabert, Llorenc, Fuller, Dorian Q. and Boivin, Nicole L. (2016) Ancient crops provide first archaeological signature of the westward Austronesian expansion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113 24: 6635-6640. doi:10.1073/pnas.1522714113


Author Crowther, Alison
Lucas, Leilani
Helm, Richard
Horton, Mark
Shipton, Ceri
Wright, Henry T.
Walshaw, Sarah
Pawlowicz, Matthew
Radimilahy, Chantal
Douka, Katerina
Picornell-Gelabert, Llorenc
Fuller, Dorian Q.
Boivin, Nicole L.
Title Ancient crops provide first archaeological signature of the westward Austronesian expansion
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1091-6490
0027-8424
Publication date 2016-06-14
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1522714113
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 113
Issue 24
Start page 6635
End page 6640
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract The Austronesian settlement of the remote island of Madagascar remains one of the great puzzles of Indo-Pacific prehistory. Although linguistic, ethnographic, and genetic evidence points clearly to a colonization of Madagascar by Austronesian language-speaking people from Island Southeast Asia, decades of archaeological research have failed to locate evidence for a Southeast Asian signature in the island's early material record. Here, we present new archaeobotanical data that show that Southeast Asian settlers brought Asian crops with them when they settled in Africa. These crops provide the first, to our knowledge, reliable archaeological window into the Southeast Asian colonization of Madagascar. They additionally suggest that initial Southeast Asian settlement in Africa was not limited to Madagascar, but also extended to the Comoros. Archaeobotanical data may support a model of indirect Austronesian colonization of Madagascar from the Comoros and/or elsewhere in eastern Africa.
Keyword Archaeobotany
Dispersal
Language
Madagascar
Rice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Social Science Publications
 
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