The ambivalent role of the physician in the child abuse syndrome

Thong Y.H. (1982) The ambivalent role of the physician in the child abuse syndrome. Medical Hypotheses, 8 4: 355-359. doi:10.1016/0306-9877(82)90028-7


Author Thong Y.H.
Title The ambivalent role of the physician in the child abuse syndrome
Journal name Medical Hypotheses   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-9877
Publication date 1982
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/0306-9877(82)90028-7
Volume 8
Issue 4
Start page 355
End page 359
Total pages 5
Subject 1309 Developmental Biology
2700 Medicine
3002 Drug Discovery
Abstract The reluctance of physicians to get involved with child abuse can be attributed to the problem of role conflict. Physicians derive their social authority from the Aesculapian tradition. This form of social authority is fragile and easily subverted, yet of utmost importance if physicians are to retain their effectiveness in the role of priest, healer and counsellor. In the child abuse syndrome, however, physicians are required by law and circumstances to report such cases to social welfare and law enforcement agencies. This at once casts the physician into the role of police collaborator. This ambivalence can be rationalised by regarding the family unit, rather than just the child, as the patient, and the referral to the social agencies as a "medical consultation".
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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Created: Sat, 09 Jul 2016, 06:29:06 EST by System User