“Country, and Western Landscapes” : Is there a ‘place’ for the Yanyuwa Tiger Shark song cycle within cultural heritage legislation and management practice in Australia.

Gorring, Dee (2001). “Country, and Western Landscapes” : Is there a ‘place’ for the Yanyuwa Tiger Shark song cycle within cultural heritage legislation and management practice in Australia. Honours Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Gorring, Dee
Thesis Title “Country, and Western Landscapes” : Is there a ‘place’ for the Yanyuwa Tiger Shark song cycle within cultural heritage legislation and management practice in Australia.
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2001-01-01
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Supervisor Anne Ross
Total pages 89
Language eng
Subjects 2002 Cultural Studies
Formatted abstract
In recent years a great deal has been written about the failure of Cultural Heritage legislation and management policies within Australia to deal with the recognition and therefore protection of all aspects of Indigenous cultural heritage. Much of the literature in this regard has been centered on Western notions of a bounded archaeological site as the main focus of legislation and management policies, which ignores the interconnectedness of different sites within a landscape. In addition to these critiques there has been a call from Indigenous communities for the inclusion of the more 'intangible' aspects of their cultural heritage such as stories, songs and designs which are interlinked with the more tangible aspects such as objects and sites. To highlight the problems inherent within Western concepts in relation to Indigenous cultural heritage, this paper investigates a Yanyuwa song cycle as an unbounded cultural heritage 'land and seascape' and the ability of current legislation within Australia to recognise and therefore protect such areas. Thus the concept of 'boundedness' and 'tangibility' are explored at length with focus being given to the conflicting views and concepts Indigenous and non-indigenous people have over land and seascapes within Australia based on traditional 'ways of seeing' inherent in each cultural perspective.
Keyword Yanyuwa Tiger Shark song cycle
Indigenous cultural heritage

 
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