A comparison of the sclerophyllous vegetation characteristic of mediterranean type climates in france california and southern australia i structure morphology and succession

Specht R.L. (1969) A comparison of the sclerophyllous vegetation characteristic of mediterranean type climates in france california and southern australia i structure morphology and succession. Australian Journal of Botany, 17 2: 277-292. doi:10.1071/BT9690277


Author Specht R.L.
Title A comparison of the sclerophyllous vegetation characteristic of mediterranean type climates in france california and southern australia i structure morphology and succession
Journal name Australian Journal of Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-9862
Publication date 1969
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/BT9690277
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 277
End page 292
Total pages 16
Subject 1110 Nursing
1105 Dentistry
Abstract A comparison was made of the plant communities characteristic of the Mediterranean type climatic regions of France, California, and southern Australia. Infertile and relatively fertile soils support two distinctive groups of plant communities. In their natural state, the climax vegetations on both soils are dominated by evergreen, sclerophyllous trees in a woodland formation. Grass and herbs form a characteristic understorey on the more fertile soils; evergreen sclerophyllous shrubs are common in the understorey on infertile soils. In drier habitats, the climax woodlands may be replaced by shrub communities such as the garrigue-maquis in France, the chaparral in California, and the heath and mallee-broombush (open scrub) vegetations in southern Australia. In a preliminary study, the characters which Schimper and others had expounded were used to compare the communities of drier habitats. Characteristics such as the presence of evergreen sclerophyllous leaves, lignotubers, and similar life-form spectra pointed to comparable vegetation. In further support of this conclusion, phenological data showed that spring was the season of maximum flowering and shoot growth of the various plant communities; the dry summer conditions reduced growth to zero except in southern Australia where growth extends through much of summer.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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