Mechanical efficiency and efficiency of storage and release of series elastic energy in skeletal muscle during stretch-shorten cycles

Ettema, G. J. C. (1996) Mechanical efficiency and efficiency of storage and release of series elastic energy in skeletal muscle during stretch-shorten cycles. Journal of Experimental Biology, 199 9: 1983-1997.

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Author Ettema, G. J. C.
Title Mechanical efficiency and efficiency of storage and release of series elastic energy in skeletal muscle during stretch-shorten cycles
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Publication date 1996-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 199
Issue 9
Start page 1983
End page 1997
Total pages 15
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher The Company of Biologists
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The mechanical energy exchanges between components of a muscle–tendon complex, i.e. the contractile element (CE) and the series elastic element (SEE), and the environment during stretch–shorten cycles were examined. The efficiency of the storage and release of series elastic energy (SEE efficiency) and the overall mechanical efficiency of the rat gastrocnemius muscle (N=5) were determined for a range of stretch–shorten contractions. SEE efficiency was defined as elastic energy released to the environment divided by external work done upon the muscle–tendon complex plus internal work exchange from the CE to the SEE. Mechanical efficiency is external work done by the muscle–tendon complex divided by the external work done upon the muscle–tendon complex plus work done by the CE. All stretch–shorten cycles were performed with a movement amplitude of 3 mm (6.7 % strain). Cycle frequency, duty factor and the onset of stimulation were altered for the different cycles. SEE efficiency varied from 0.02 to 0.85, mechanical efficiency from 0.43 to 0.92. SEE efficiency depended on the timing of stimulation and net muscle power in different ways. Mechanical efficiency was much more closely correlated with net power. The timing of muscle relaxation was crucial for the effective release of elastic energy. Simulated in vivo contractions indicated that during rat locomotion the gastrocnemius may have a role other than that of effectively storing elastic energy and generating work. Computer simulations showed that the amount of series elastic compliance can affect the internal energetics of a muscle contraction strongly without changing the muscle force generation dramatically.
Keyword Elasticity
Energetics
Locomotion
Rat
Rattus norvegicus
Skeletal muscle
Work loop
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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