Health benefits from nature experiences depend on dose

Shanahan, Danielle F., Bush, Robert, Gaston, Kevin J., Lin, Brenda B., Dean, Julie, Barber, Elizabeth and Fuller, Richard A. (2016) Health benefits from nature experiences depend on dose. Scientific Reports, 6 28551: 1-10. doi:10.1038/srep28551

Author Shanahan, Danielle F.
Bush, Robert
Gaston, Kevin J.
Lin, Brenda B.
Dean, Julie
Barber, Elizabeth
Fuller, Richard A.
Title Health benefits from nature experiences depend on dose
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2016-06-23
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep28551
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 28551
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Nature within cities will have a central role in helping address key global public health challenges associated with urbanization. However, there is almost no guidance on how much or how frequently people need to engage with nature, and what types or characteristics of nature need to be incorporated in cities for the best health outcomes. Here we use a nature dose framework to examine the associations between the duration, frequency and intensity of exposure to nature and health in an urban population. We show that people who made long visits to green spaces had lower rates of depression and high blood pressure, and those who visited more frequently had greater social cohesion. Higher levels of physical activity were linked to both duration and frequency of green space visits. A dose-response analysis for depression and high blood pressure suggest that visits to outdoor green spaces of 30 minutes or more during the course of a week could reduce the population prevalence of these illnesses by up to 7% and 9% respectively. Given that the societal costs of depression alone in Australia are estimated at AUD$12.6 billion per annum, savings to public health budgets across all health outcomes could be immense.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Biological Sciences Publications
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Created: Wed, 29 Jun 2016, 09:59:21 EST by Julie Dean on behalf of School of Public Health