Catecholamine innervation of the intestine of flying foxes (Pteropus spp.): a substantial supply from enteric neurons

Keast J.R. (1994) Catecholamine innervation of the intestine of flying foxes (Pteropus spp.): a substantial supply from enteric neurons. Cell and Tissue Research, 276 2: 403-410. doi:10.1007/BF00306126


Author Keast J.R.
Title Catecholamine innervation of the intestine of flying foxes (Pteropus spp.): a substantial supply from enteric neurons
Journal name Cell and Tissue Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0302-766X
Publication date 1994
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF00306126
Volume 276
Issue 2
Start page 403
End page 410
Total pages 8
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Subject 2702 Anatomy
1308 Clinical Biochemistry
1307 Cell Biology
Abstract The distribution of catecholamines in the small and large intestine of flying foxes (Pteropus spp.) was investigated using glyoxylic-acid-induced fluorescence and immunohistochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase. Dense networks of varicose axons stained by each of these methods supplied blood vessels, the mucosa and both submucous and myenteric ganglia, but were scarce in the circular and longitudinal muscle. The majority (>90%) of submucous neuronal perikarya contained both enzymes and most of these also exhibited catecholamine fluorescence. Somata of similar staining characteristics were less common in the myenteric plexus, where single cells were found in only the minority of ganglia. All of the stained submucosal somata and mucosal axons contained vasoactive intestinal peptide, whereas catecholamine-containing axons that supplied the ganglia, external muscle and blood vessels did not. It is concluded that (1) there is dense catecholamine innervation of most tissues in the flyingfox intestine, similar to many other mammals, (2) mucosal axons originate from enteric catecholamine neurons, not found in other mammals, and (3) axons supplying the blood vessels and enteric ganglia are probably of sympathetic origin and can be distinguished from the intrinsic catecholamine-containing axons by their lack of vasoactive intestinal peptide. The roles and interactions of these two types of catecholamine innervation in the control of secretion and motility remain to be identified.
Keyword Catecholamine histofluorescence
Enteric nervous system
Immunohistochemistry
Noradrenaline
Pteropus poliocephalus, P. scapulatus (Chiroptera)
Sympathetic nervous system
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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