Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction

Szabo, E. A., Pemberton, J. M. and Desmarchelier, P. M. (1993) Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 59 9: 3011-3020.

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Author Szabo, E. A.
Pemberton, J. M.
Desmarchelier, P. M.
Title Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction
Journal name Applied and Environmental Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0099-2240
1098-5336
Publication date 1993-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 59
Issue 9
Start page 3011
End page 3020
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used as the basis for the development of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for organisms harboring botulinum neurotoxin type A through E genes. Synthetic DNA primers were selected from nucleic acid sequence data for Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Individual components of the PCR for each serotype (serotypes A through E) were adjusted for optimal amplification of the target fragment. Each PCR assay was tested with organisms expressing each of the botulinum neurotoxin types (types A through G), Clostridium tetani, genetically related nontoxigenic organisms, and unrelated strains. Each assay was specific for the intended target. The PCR reliably identified multiple strains having the same neurotoxin type. The sensitivity of the test was determined with different concentrations of genomic DNA from strains producing each toxin type. As little as 10 fg of DNA (approximately three clostridial cells) was detected. C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E, which are most commonly associated with human botulism, could be amplified from crude DNA extracts, from vegetative cells, and from spore preparations. This suggests that there is great potential for the PCR in the identification and detection of botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
School of Medicine Publications
 
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