Modelling the impact of predation on reintroductions of bridled nailtail wallabies

McCallurn H., Timmers P. and Hoyle S. (1995) Modelling the impact of predation on reintroductions of bridled nailtail wallabies. Wildlife Research, 22 2: 163-171. doi:10.1071/WR9950163


Author McCallurn H.
Timmers P.
Hoyle S.
Title Modelling the impact of predation on reintroductions of bridled nailtail wallabies
Journal name Wildlife Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1035-3712
Publication date 1995-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/WR9950163
Volume 22
Issue 2
Start page 163
End page 171
Total pages 9
Subject 2308 Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
1105 Dentistry
2300 Environmental Science
1900 Earth and Planetary Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
2303 Ecology
Abstract Predation by introduced foxes and cats is generally thought to be the main reason for the poor success rate of macropod reintroductions on the Australian mainland. Predator-prey theory suggests that predation may have particularly severe impacts on very small populations, especially if a more common primary prey species is present (such as the rabbit). Thus, a sufficiently large reintroduction may overcome predation and succeed where a smaller one would fail. The minimum viable population would, however, be much larger than that predicted by standard population-viability analysis. We use a simple stochastic model based upon the bridled nailtail wallaby to explore this possibility. Even very small amounts of predation (2-4 individuals per six months) can be sufficient to cause reintroductions of up to 50 animals to fail. No clear threshold population size beyond which reintroductions will succeed is evident and, for a given mean, the probability distribution of predation has a very limited impact on the success of reintroductions. In almost all circumstances, a single reintroduction of a given size is preferable to multiple reintroductions of the same total number of individuals.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Jun 2016, 12:18:21 EST by System User