Longitudinal study of impaired intra- and inter-network brain connectivity in subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease

Zhan, Yafeng, Ma, Jianhua, Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F., Xu, Kaibin, Cui, Yue, Feng, Qianjin, Jiang, Tianzi and Liu, Yong (2016) Longitudinal study of impaired intra- and inter-network brain connectivity in subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 52 3: 913-927. doi:10.3233/JAD-160008


Author Zhan, Yafeng
Ma, Jianhua
Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F.
Xu, Kaibin
Cui, Yue
Feng, Qianjin
Jiang, Tianzi
Liu, Yong
Title Longitudinal study of impaired intra- and inter-network brain connectivity in subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease
Journal name Journal of Alzheimer's Disease   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1875-8908
1387-2877
Publication date 2016-05-23
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3233/JAD-160008
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 52
Issue 3
Start page 913
End page 927
Total pages 15
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher IOS Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with abnormal resting-state network (RSN) architecture of the default mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN), the executive control network (CON), the salience network (SAL), and the sensory-motor network (SMN). However, little is known about the disrupted intra- and inter-network architecture in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Here, we employed a priori defined regions of interest to investigate the intra- and inter-network functional connectivity profiles of these RSNs in longitudinal participants, including normal controls (n=23), participants with early MCI (n=26), and participants with late MCI (n=19). We found longitudinal alterations of functional connectivity within the DMN, where they were correlated with variation in cognitive ability. The SAL as well as the interaction between the DMN and the SAL were disrupted in MCI. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that longitudinal alterations of functional connectivity are more profound in earlier stages as opposed to later stages of the disease. The increased severity of cognitive impairment is associated with increasingly altered RSN connectivity patterns, suggesting that disruptions in functional connectivity may contribute to cognitive dysfunction and may represent a potential biomarker of impaired cognitive ability in MCI. Earlier prevention and treatment may help to delay disease progression to AD.
Keyword Default mode network
Early mild cognitive impairment
Late mild cognitive impairment
Resting-state network
Salience network
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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