Molecular breeding for complex adaptive traits: how integrating crop ecophysiology and modelling can enhance efficiency

Hammer, Graeme, Messina, Charlie, van Oosterom, Erik, Chapman, Scott, Singh, Vijaya, Borrell, Andrew, Jordan, David and Cooper, Mark (2016). Molecular breeding for complex adaptive traits: how integrating crop ecophysiology and modelling can enhance efficiency. In Yin, Xinyou and Struik, Paul C. (Ed.), Crop systems biology: narrowing the gaps between crop modelling and genetics (pp. 147-162) Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-20562-5_7


Author Hammer, Graeme
Messina, Charlie
van Oosterom, Erik
Chapman, Scott
Singh, Vijaya
Borrell, Andrew
Jordan, David
Cooper, Mark
Title of chapter Molecular breeding for complex adaptive traits: how integrating crop ecophysiology and modelling can enhance efficiency
Title of book Crop systems biology: narrowing the gaps between crop modelling and genetics
Place of Publication Cham, Switzerland
Publisher Springer International Publishing
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20562-5_7
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9783319205618
9783319205625
Editor Yin, Xinyou
Struik, Paul C.
Chapter number 7
Start page 147
End page 162
Total pages 16
Total chapters 10
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Progress in crop improvement is limited by the ability to identify favourable combinations of genotypes (G) and management practices (M) in relevant target environments (E) given the resources available to search among the myriad of possible combinations. To underpin yield advance we require prediction of phenotype based on genotype. In plant breeding, traditional phenotypic selection methods have involved measuring phenotypic performance of large segregating populations in multi-environment trials and applying rigorous statistical procedures based on quantitative genetic theory to identify superior individuals. Recent developments in the ability to inexpensively and densely map/sequence genomes have facilitated a shift from the level of the individual (genotype) to the level of the genomic region. Molecular breeding strategies using genome wide prediction and genomic selection approaches have developed rapidly. However, their applicability to complex traits remains constrained by gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, which restrict the predictive power of associations of genomic regions with phenotypic responses. Here it is argued that crop ecophysiology and functional whole plant modelling can provide an effective link between molecular and organism scales and enhance molecular breeding by adding value to genetic prediction approaches. A physiological framework that facilitates dissection and modelling of complex traits can inform phenotyping methods for marker/gene detection and underpin prediction of likely phenotypic consequences of trait and genetic variation in target environments. This approach holds considerable promise for more effectively linking genotype to phenotype for complex adaptive traits. Specific examples focused on drought adaptation are presented to highlight the concepts.
Keyword Genotype-to-phenotype
Phenotypic prediction
Trait physiology
QTL
Functional genomics
Crop improvement
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 20 Jun 2016, 13:00:25 EST by Janelle Low on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation