Serum folate concentrations and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality: a cohort study based on 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

Peng, Yang, Dong, Bin and Wang, Zhiqiang (2016) Serum folate concentrations and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality: a cohort study based on 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). International Journal of Cardiology, 219 136-142. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.06.024


Author Peng, Yang
Dong, Bin
Wang, Zhiqiang
Title Serum folate concentrations and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality: a cohort study based on 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
Journal name International Journal of Cardiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-5273
1874-1754
Publication date 2016-09-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.06.024
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 219
Start page 136
End page 142
Total pages 7
Place of publication Shannon, Clare, Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
The relationships between serum folate levels and all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality are controversial.

Methods
Utilizing 1999–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and linked mortality data, we performed a cohort study with 28,845 participants and used Cox proportional hazards models and restricted cubic spline plots to elucidate the dose–response relationships between serum folate status and all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality.

Results
During an average follow-up for 6.2 years, 2821, 545 and 628 deaths were attributed to all-causes, CVD and cancer, respectively. Lower folate levels were associated with increased mortality, with hazards ratios of 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–1.47) for all-cause mortality, 1.33 (95% CI: 1.01–1.76) for CVD mortality, and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.16–1.87) for cancer mortality (first quartiles versus second quartiles). A reversed J-shaped pattern was apparently observed in males and younger participants when analyzing all-cause mortality and in younger participants when it comes to CVD and cancer mortality.

Conclusions
Lower folate levels, but not restricted to folate deficiency, are linked with higher rates of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality. Adverse effects of excess folate as well as age and gender differences on mortality need further investigation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Sat, 18 Jun 2016, 14:06:32 EST by Yang Peng on behalf of School of Medicine