An international study of consumption and contribution to social media by medical students

Byrne-Davis, Lucie M. T., Lake, Laura, Hart, Jo, Mooney, Jane, Scott, Karen M., Al-Ozairi, Ebaa, Burn, Daniel, Jurd, Kate, Nairn, Judith, Velan, Gary M., Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia, Matava, Clyde, Abd El-Moneim, Ehab S. and Lumsden, Colin J. (2016) An international study of consumption and contribution to social media by medical students. Journal of the European Association for Health Information and Libraries, 11 2: 25-33.

Author Byrne-Davis, Lucie M. T.
Lake, Laura
Hart, Jo
Mooney, Jane
Scott, Karen M.
Al-Ozairi, Ebaa
Burn, Daniel
Jurd, Kate
Nairn, Judith
Velan, Gary M.
Al-Abdulrazzaq, Dalia
Matava, Clyde
Abd El-Moneim, Ehab S.
Lumsden, Colin J.
Title An international study of consumption and contribution to social media by medical students
Journal name Journal of the European Association for Health Information and Libraries   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1841-0715
2392-8131
Publication date 2016-06
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 25
End page 33
Total pages 9
Place of publication Maarssen, Netherlands
Publisher European Association for Health Information and Libraries
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Understanding how students and educators use social media, and their perceptions of its benefits, may lead to opportunities for successful integration of social media to benefit all those involved in medical education. We aimed to explore and describe how medical students use social media in countries across the world, including the extent to which they consume and contribute. 741 students from 8 institutions in 5 countries answered a 16-item questionnaire. The majority of students were using some form of social media, with the most popular application being Facebook. Social communication and entertainment were the most cited reasons for using social media. Students reported valuing social media for educational reasons and, in particular, information and resource sharing between peers. Institution-student interactions were not common amongst medical students and whilst some students reported wanting more of this, others reported that they did not. The paucity of student-institution interactions on social media did not vary across institutions. Although some students could see benefits to increasing use of social media by medical schools, others had concerns about this. Of particular concern were confidentiality and professionalism online and the perception that the medical schools might not do it well. Medical schools should have a clear rationale for engaging further in social media, mindful of what students want and of the need for the engagement to be conducted professionally.
Keyword Social media
Undergraduate medicine
Social learning
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Full text available at http://eahil.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/journal-2-2016-WEB-002.pdf

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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Created: Fri, 17 Jun 2016, 09:25:53 EST by Jacky Cribb on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)