When a non-resident worker is a non-resident parent: investigating the impact of Fly-in/Fly-out work practices in Australia

Dittman, Casandra K., Henriquez, Ashley and Roxburgh, Natalie (2016) When a non-resident worker is a non-resident parent: investigating the impact of Fly-in/Fly-out work practices in Australia. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 25 9: 2778-2796. doi:10.1007/s10826-016-0437-2


Author Dittman, Casandra K.
Henriquez, Ashley
Roxburgh, Natalie
Title When a non-resident worker is a non-resident parent: investigating the impact of Fly-in/Fly-out work practices in Australia
Journal name Journal of Child and Family Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1062-1024
1573-2843
Publication date 2016
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10826-016-0437-2
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 25
Issue 9
Start page 2778
End page 2796
Total pages 19
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Non-resident work practices, which involve prolonged separations from family, long-distance commuting between home and remote work sites and long work hours across compressed rosters, are now commonplace in Australia. This study examined the impact of these work arrangements, often termed Fly-In/Fly-Out (FIFO), on children and families, and to identify family-related and employment-related factors that influence child and family outcomes. Anonymous online surveys containing measures of family and couple relationship quality, child behavioral and emotional adjustment, parenting and personal adjustment were completed by 232 partners of FIFO workers, 46 FIFO workers, and a comparison group of community parents (N = 294 mothers, N = 36 fathers). There were no differences between FIFO partners and community parents on family or couple relationship quality, parenting competence and child behavioral or emotional difficulties. FIFO partners reported higher levels of personal emotional problems and greater usage of harsh discipline practices than community mothers, while FIFO workers reported greater work to family conflict and alcohol use than community fathers. Regression analyses on the FIFO partners sample indicated that child and family functioning were best predicted by family factors, including harsh parenting and parental emotional adjustment. Implications of the findings for the design and provision of family-based support for FIFO families are discussed.
Keyword Child behavior problems
Child emotional difficulties
Parenting
Family functioning
Non-resident work practices
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2016, 12:53:37 EST by Dr Cassandra Karlie Dittman on behalf of School of Psychology