Measurements of oxygen uptake, heart and gill bailer rates of the callianassid burrowing shrimp Trypaea australiensis Dana and its responses to low oxygen tensions

Paterson B.D. and Thorne M.J. (1995) Measurements of oxygen uptake, heart and gill bailer rates of the callianassid burrowing shrimp Trypaea australiensis Dana and its responses to low oxygen tensions. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 194 1: 39-52.

Author Paterson B.D.
Thorne M.J.
Title Measurements of oxygen uptake, heart and gill bailer rates of the callianassid burrowing shrimp Trypaea australiensis Dana and its responses to low oxygen tensions
Journal name Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0981
Publication date 1995-12-13
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 194
Issue 1
Start page 39
End page 52
Total pages 14
Subject 1105 Dentistry
1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine
2303 Ecology
Abstract Burrowing shrimps are likely to encounter temporal and spatial changes in oxygen tension as they move about in their burrows. Callianassid shrimps apparently tolerate a wide range of oxygen tensions so the physiological nature of this tolerance is of interest. The oxygen uptake, heart and gill bailer rates of the burrow-dwelling shrimp, Trypaea australiensis Dana were studied in the laboratory, particularly during falling oxygen tension. Trypaea australiensis had a critical point (Pc) of oxygen uptake of about 5 kPa and showed a very low "settled" or routine respiration rate (25.6 ± 6.31 μmol O2 · kg-1 · min-1, mean ± sd) for a decapod crustacean of this size (2 to 6 g wet weight). Some of the variation in oxygen uptake rate was explained by body size and the weight exponent (b) increased significantly when shrimp recovered from handling. The heart and bailers of T. australiensis showed the same general responses to a gradual fall in oxygen tension as do other crustaceans that are strong "oxy-regulators" and the heart beat decreased but persisted during anoxic conditions, and responded rapidly to re-oxygenation. An acute fall in oxygen tension (<1.5 kPa) did not lead to bradycardia. These results are consistent with an animal that attempts to prolong aerobiosis for as long as possible but which nevertheless curtails heart rate and presumably metabolic rate in response to long-term anoxia.
Keyword Anoxic
Heart
Hypoxic
Oxygen
Respiration
Scaphognathite
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2016, 04:17:22 EST by System User