Predator shoaling moderates the confusion effect in blue-green chromis, Chromis viridis

Smith M.F.L. and Warburton K. (1992) Predator shoaling moderates the confusion effect in blue-green chromis, Chromis viridis. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 30 2: 103-107. doi:10.1007/BF00173946


Author Smith M.F.L.
Warburton K.
Title Predator shoaling moderates the confusion effect in blue-green chromis, Chromis viridis
Journal name Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0340-5443
Publication date 1992
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/BF00173946
Volume 30
Issue 2
Start page 103
End page 107
Total pages 5
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Subject 2802 Behavioral Neuroscience
2303 Ecology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1900 Earth and Planetary Sciences
2300 Environmental Science
Abstract In experiments, blue-green chromis [Chromis viridis (Cuvier 1830)] were fed on either scattered or aggregated swarms of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.). Ten runs with each prey dispersion treatment were performed with shoals of one, two, five and ten chromis. The mean lag in reaching peak feeding rate for fish fed on aggregated prey was significantly shorter in the larger chromis shoals. In contrast, with the scattered treatment all such lags were similar and very short. As foraging proceeded, higher feeding rates were observed in the larger feeding shoals, regardless of prey dispersion. Prey capture success (i.e. the rate of retention of intercepted prey) declined with time, but was significantly higher in groups of ten fish. Two main conclusions emerge. Firstly, grouping facilitated initiation of feeding by individuals preying on concentrated swarms and reduced the delay in reaching a maximum feeding level. This may have been due to a suppression of the confusion effect through reduced reliance upon vigilance. Secondly, reduced vigilance allowed larger shoals of chromis to feed effectively over more extended periods. Trends of increasing shoal cohesion and decreasing prey retention rate with time were consistent with a postulated increase in antipredator vigilance with declining feeding motivation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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