Motor speech impairment in a case of childhood basilar artery stroke: Treatment directions derived from physiological and perceptual assessment

Horton S.K., Murdoch B.E., Theodoros D.G. and Thompson E.C. (1997) Motor speech impairment in a case of childhood basilar artery stroke: Treatment directions derived from physiological and perceptual assessment. Pediatric Rehabilitation, 1 3: 163-177.

Author Horton S.K.
Murdoch B.E.
Theodoros D.G.
Thompson E.C.
Title Motor speech impairment in a case of childhood basilar artery stroke: Treatment directions derived from physiological and perceptual assessment
Journal name Pediatric Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1363-8491
Publication date 1997
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 1
Issue 3
Start page 163
End page 177
Total pages 15
Subject 2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2742 Rehabilitation
Abstract The perceptual and physiological characteristics of the speech of a nine year old child who suffered a basilar artery stroke at the age of five years were investigated using a battery of perceptual and physiological instrumental measures. Perceptual tests administered included the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment, a perceptual analysis of a speech sample based on a reading of the Grandfather Passage and a phonetic intelligibility test. Instrumental procedures included: spirometric and kinematic analysis of speech breathing; electroglottographic evaluation of laryngeal function, nasometric assessment of velopharyngeal function and evaluation of lip and tongue function using pressure transducers. Physiological assessment indicated the most severe deficits to be in the respiratory and velopharyngeal sub-systems with significant deficits in the articulatory sub-system, all of which resulted in severely reduced intelligibility. These results were compared and contrasted with the subject's performance on the perceptual assessment battery. In a number of instances the physiological assessments were able to identify deficits in the functioning of components of the speech production apparatus either not evidenced by the perceptual assessments or where the findings of the various perceptual assessments were contradictory. The resulting comprehensive profile of the child's dysarthria demonstrated the value of using an assessment battery comprised of both physiological and perceptual methods. In particular, the need to include instrumental analysis of the functioning of the various subcomponents of the speech production apparatus in the assessment battery when defining the treatment priorities for children with acquired dysarthria is highlighted. Treatment priorities determined on the basis of both the perceptual and physiological assessments for the present CVA case are discussed.
Keyword Childhood stroke
Dysarthria
Speech disorder
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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