Stereotyped behaviour, adjunctive drinking and the feeding periods of tethered sows

Rushen J. (1984) Stereotyped behaviour, adjunctive drinking and the feeding periods of tethered sows. Animal Behaviour, 32 4: 1059-1067. doi:10.1016/S0003-3472(84)80222-5


Author Rushen J.
Title Stereotyped behaviour, adjunctive drinking and the feeding periods of tethered sows
Journal name Animal Behaviour   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-3472
Publication date 1984
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0003-3472(84)80222-5
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 1059
End page 1067
Total pages 9
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1105 Dentistry
Abstract The behaviour of 25 tethered sows in an intensive piggery was observed for 1 h before and 1 h after the delivery of food to determine if behavioural stereotypies appeared as adjunctive behaviours. The different components of behavioural stereotypies were found to have different associations with the feeding period. Head-waving, bar-biting, and rubbing the snout against the cage were most common before feeding, and were shown particularly by the older sows. Manipulating the drinker and, for some sows, rubbing were most common after. There was some evidence of polydipsia. Vacuum chewing, playing with the chain, and aggressive behaviours, however, did not appear to be associated with the feeding period. The last two behaviours occurred only rarely. Seven sows showed stereotyped sequences of rapid rubbing or rapid drinking after the delivery of food, and these sows showed more excitement before food was delivered. Rooting was common for the full hour after all food had been consumed, and occurred in conjunction with long duration drinking. I suggest that the occurrence of adjunctive drinking by sows results from the persistence of feeding motivation, perhaps because concentrated food does not provide sufficient stomach distension, combined with the knowledge that food will definitely not be forthcoming. Stereotyped sequences of behaviour may be a means of reducing the arousal generated by the expectation of food.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Scopus Import
 
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