Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in -cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

Yim, Wei Tsun, Bhandari, Bhesh, Jackson, Louise and James, Peter (2016) Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in -cyclodextrin inclusion complexes. Veterinary Parasitology, 225 99-103. doi:10.1016/j.vetpar.2016.06.007


Author Yim, Wei Tsun
Bhandari, Bhesh
Jackson, Louise
James, Peter
Title Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in -cyclodextrin inclusion complexes
Formatted title
Repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against cattle tick larvae (Rhipicephalus australis) when formulated as emulsions and in ß-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes
Journal name Veterinary Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-2550
0304-4017
Publication date 2016-07-30
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.vetpar.2016.06.007
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 225
Start page 99
End page 103
Total pages 5
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Rhipicephalus australis (formerly Boophilus microplus) is a one host tick responsible for major economic loss in tropical and subtropical cattle production enterprises. Control is largely dependent on the application of acaricides but resistance has developed to most currently registered chemical groups. Repellent compounds that prevent initial attachment of tick larvae offer a potential alternative to control with chemical toxicants. The repellent effects of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (TTO) emulsions and two β-cyclodextrin complex formulations, a slow release form (SR) and a modified faster release form (FR), were examined in a series of laboratory studies.

Emulsions containing 4% and 5% TTO applied to cattle hair in laboratory studies completely repelled ascending tick larvae for 24 h whereas 2% and 3% formulations provided 80% protection. At 48 h, 5% TTO provided 78% repellency but lower concentrations repelled less than 60% of larvae. In a study conducted over 15 days, 3% TTO emulsion applied to cattle hair provided close to 100% repellency for 2 days, but then protection fell to 23% by day 15. The FR formulation gave significantly greater repellency than the emulsion and the SR formulation from day 3 until the end of the study (P < 0.05), providing almost complete repellency at day 3 (99.5%), then decreasing over the period of the study to 49% repellency at day 15. Proof of concept is established for the use of appropriately designed controlled-release formulations to extend the period of repellency provided by TTO against R. australis larvae.
Keyword Rhipicephalus microplus;
Microparticles
Controlled release
Ectoparasite
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Jun 2016, 18:33:26 EST by Dr Peter James on behalf of Centre for Animal Science