The association between built environment features and physical activity in the Australian context: a synthesis of the literature

Zapata-Diomedi, Belen and Veerman, Lennert J. (2016) The association between built environment features and physical activity in the Australian context: a synthesis of the literature. BMC Public Health, 16 1: 484 .1-484 .10. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3154-2


Author Zapata-Diomedi, Belen
Veerman, Lennert J.
Title The association between built environment features and physical activity in the Australian context: a synthesis of the literature
Journal name BMC Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2458
Publication date 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3154-2
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 16
Issue 1
Start page 484 .1
End page 484 .10
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: There is growing evidence indicating that the built environment is a determinant of physical activity. However, despite the well-established health benefits of physical activity this is rarely considered in urban planning. We summarised recent Australian evidence for the association built environment-physical activity among adults. This summary aims to inform policy makers who advocate for the consideration of health in urban planning.

Methods:
A combination of built environment and physical activity terms were used to systematically identify relevant peer reviewed and grey literature.

Results: A total of 23 studies were included, providing 139 tests of associations between specific built environment features and physical activity. Of the total, 84 relationships using objective measures of built environment attributes were evaluated, whereas 55 relationships using self-reported measures were evaluated. Our results indicate that walkable neighbourhoods with a wide range of local destinations to go to, as well as a diverse use of land, encourage physical activity among their residents.

Conclusions: This research provides a summary of recent Australian evidence on built environments that are most favourable for physical activity. Features of walkability and availability of destinations within walking distance should be accounted for in the development or redevelopment of urban areas. Our findings emphasise the importance of urban planning for health via its impact on population levels of physical activity.
Keyword Built environment
Physical activity
Australia
Association
Review
Health
Policy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 09 Jun 2016, 09:12:35 EST by Belen Zapata Diomedi on behalf of School of Public Health