Systematic review of interventions to improve the provision of information for adults with primary brain tumors and their caregivers

Langbecker, Danette and Janda, Monika (2015) Systematic review of interventions to improve the provision of information for adults with primary brain tumors and their caregivers. Frontiers in Oncology, 5 111-121. doi:10.3389/fonc.2015.00001


Author Langbecker, Danette
Janda, Monika
Title Systematic review of interventions to improve the provision of information for adults with primary brain tumors and their caregivers
Journal name Frontiers in Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2234-943X
ISBN 9782889197828
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3389/fonc.2015.00001
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Start page 111
End page 121
Total pages 11
Editor Tamara Ownsworth
Suzanne Chambers
Haryana Dhillon
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Adults with primary brain tumors and their caregivers have significant information needs. This review assessed the effect of interventions to improve information provision for adult primary brain tumor patients and/or their caregivers.

Methods: We included randomized or non-randomized trials testing educational interventions that had outcomes of information provision, knowledge, understanding, recall, or satisfaction with the intervention, for adults diagnosed with primary brain tumors and/or their family or caregivers. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched for studies published between 1980 and June 2014.

Results: Two randomized controlled, 1 non-randomized controlled, and 10 single group pre–post trials enrolled more than 411 participants. Five group, four practice/process change, and four individual interventions assessed satisfaction (12 studies), knowledge (4 studies), and information provision (2 studies). Nine studies reported high rates of satisfaction. Three studies showed statistically significant improvements over time in knowledge and two showed greater information was provided to intervention than control group participants, although statistical testing was not performed.

Discussion: The trials assessed intermediate outcomes such as satisfaction, and only 4/13 reported on knowledge improvements. Few trials had a randomized controlled design and risk of bias was either evident or could not be assessed in most domains.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Non HERDC
Centre for Online Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 07 Jun 2016, 13:03:48 EST by Danette Langbecker on behalf of Centre for On-Line Health