True to what We stand for: Championing collective interests as a path to authentic leadership

Steffens, Nick K., Mols, Frank, Haslam, S. Alexander and Okimoto, Tyler G. (2016) True to what We stand for: Championing collective interests as a path to authentic leadership. The Leadership Quarterly, 27 5: 726-744. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.04.004


Author Steffens, Nick K.
Mols, Frank
Haslam, S. Alexander
Okimoto, Tyler G.
Title True to what We stand for: Championing collective interests as a path to authentic leadership
Formatted title
True to what We stand for: Championing collective interests as a path to authentic leadership
Journal name The Leadership Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1048-9843
1873-3409
Publication date 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.04.004
Volume 27
Issue 5
Start page 726
End page 744
Total pages 19
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Growing evidence points to the role of authentic leadership in enhancing followership. Yet little is known about the factors that determine whether followers perceive leaders as displaying authentic leadership. In the present research, we examine the impact of leaders' championing of collective (group) interests on authentic leadership. Study 1 shows experimentally that compared to a leader who advances personal interests, a leader who advances the interests of a collective is (a) perceived as offering more authentic leadership and (b) more likely to inspire followership. Findings are followed up in a field study revealing that leaders' championing of collective interests is associated with greater perceived authentic leadership and followership (in terms of voting intentions). Furthermore, results indicate that shared self-categorization is a boundary condition of these relationships such that the relationship between a leader's championing of collective (group) interests and authentic leadership (and followership) is more pronounced for perceivers who self-categorize as members of the group that a leader is leading (rather than of a different group). In sum, findings suggest that leaders are regarded as more authentic to the extent that they are true to the collective identity of the group that they lead.
Keyword Leadership
Followership
Authentic leadership
Self-categorization
Identity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 06 Jun 2016, 12:00:18 EST by Dr. Tyler G. Okimoto on behalf of UQ Business School