Abiotic and biotic interactions determine whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation management

Southwell, Darren M., Rhodes, Jonathan R., McDonald-Madden, Eve, Nicol, Sam, Helmstedt, Kate J. and McCarthy, Michael A. (2016) Abiotic and biotic interactions determine whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation management. Theoretical Population Biology, 109 44-53. doi:10.1016/j.tpb.2016.02.001


Author Southwell, Darren M.
Rhodes, Jonathan R.
McDonald-Madden, Eve
Nicol, Sam
Helmstedt, Kate J.
McCarthy, Michael A.
Title Abiotic and biotic interactions determine whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation management
Journal name Theoretical Population Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-0325
0040-5809
Publication date 2016-06-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.tpb.2016.02.001
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 109
Start page 44
End page 53
Total pages 10
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO United States
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Increasing the colonization rate of metapopulations can improve persistence, but can also increase exposure to threats. To make good decisions, managers must understand whether increased colonization is beneficial or detrimental to metapopulation persistence. While a number of studies have examined interactions between metapopulations, colonization, and threats, they have assumed that threat dynamics respond linearly to changes in colonization. Here, we determined when to increase colonization while explicitly accounting for non-linear dependencies between a metapopulation and its threats. We developed patch occupancy metapopulation models for species susceptible to abiotic, generalist, and specialist threats and modeled the total derivative of the equilibrium proportion of patches occupied by each metapopulation with respect to the colonization rate. By using the total derivative, we developed a rule for determining when to increase metapopulation colonization. This rule was applied to a simulated metapopulation where the dynamics of each threat responded to increased colonization following a power function. Before modifying colonization, we show that managers must understand: (1) whether a metapopulation is susceptible to a threat; (2) the type of threat acting on a metapopulation; (3) which component of threat dynamics might depend on colonization, and; (4) the likely response of a threat-dependent variable to changes in colonization. The sensitivity of management decisions to these interactions increases uncertainty in conservation planning decisions.
Keyword Colonization
Metapopulation
Predator-prey
Host-pathogen
Epidemiology
Abiotic threats
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 05 Jun 2016, 00:17:35 EST by System User on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management