The presence of pathological eating behaviours in non-clinical samples : is there a continuum of emotional eating

Wilson, Melinda (2001). The presence of pathological eating behaviours in non-clinical samples : is there a continuum of emotional eating Master's Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Wilson, Melinda
Thesis Title The presence of pathological eating behaviours in non-clinical samples : is there a continuum of emotional eating
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2001
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Supervisor Unknown
Total pages 1 v.
Language eng
Subjects 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Formatted abstract
In recent years, Binge Eating Disorder (BED) has been identified as a separate, distinct form of eating disturbance. Recent literature has come to suggest that binge eating may lie on a continuum of severity, with frequent clinical binge eating on one end and infrequent occasional overeating on the other end. What has now become of interest are those individuals who fall in the middle to late end of the continuum, and what sorts of eating attitudes and behaviours they may display. It is suggested in this study that there may be a group of individuals in the middle of this continuum, who eat in response to positive emotions and who display some level of pathological eating behaviours. To test the hypotheses252 college students were given a battery of questionnaires which included the EES, the EDE-Q and the IIP-40. Various univariate and multivariate tests were conducted as well as a discriminant function analysis. Results showed that the groups, non-clinical, comfort and clinical, could be separated according to the emotions which created an urge to eat, the emotions experienced after eating, as well as level of restriction, eating in secret and level of interpersonal problems. Specifically, the clinical group experienced the highest level of pathology in all areas, including restriction, interpersonal problems and the impact of depression on the urge to eat. The comfort group, which was placed between the two extremes on the continuum, also ate in response to depressive emotions, rather than positive emotions and experienced a moderate level of interpersonal problems. It is suggested that emotional eating in non-clinical samples should not be ruled out and should be further examined with more specific methodology.
Keyword Eating disorders
Compulsive eating

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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