Transgressive women don’t deserve protection: young men’s narratives of sexual violence against women in rural Papua New Guinea

Kelly-Hanku, A., Aeno, H., Wilson, L., Eves, R., Mek, A., Nake Trumb, R., Whittaker, M., Fitzgerald, L., Kaldor, J. M. and Vallely, A. (2016) Transgressive women don’t deserve protection: young men’s narratives of sexual violence against women in rural Papua New Guinea. Culture, Health and Sexuality, 18 11: 1207-1220. doi:10.1080/13691058.2016.1182216


Author Kelly-Hanku, A.
Aeno, H.
Wilson, L.
Eves, R.
Mek, A.
Nake Trumb, R.
Whittaker, M.
Fitzgerald, L.
Kaldor, J. M.
Vallely, A.
Title Transgressive women don’t deserve protection: young men’s narratives of sexual violence against women in rural Papua New Guinea
Journal name Culture, Health and Sexuality   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-1058
1464-5351
Publication date 2016-06-02
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13691058.2016.1182216
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 18
Issue 11
Start page 1207
End page 1220
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Sexual violence against women and girls is commonplace in Papua New Guinea (PNG). While the experiences of women are rightly given central place in institutional responses to sexual violence, the men who perpetrate violence are often overlooked, an oversight that undermines the effectiveness of prevention efforts. This paper draws on interviews conducted with young men as part of a qualitative longitudinal study of masculinity and male sexuality in a rural highland area of PNG. It explores one aspect of male sexuality: men’s narratives of sexual violence. Most striking from the data is that the collective enactment of sexual violence against women and girls is reported as an everyday and accepted practice amongst young men. However, not all women and girls were described as equally at risk, with those who transgress gender roles and roles inscribed and reinforced by patriarchal structures, at greater risk. To address this situation, efforts to reduce sexual violence against women and girls require an increased focus on male-centred intervention to critically engage with the forms of patriarchal authority that give license to sexual violence. Understanding the perceptions and experiences of men as perpetrators of sexual violence is a critical first step in the process of changing normative perceptions of gender, a task crucial to reducing sexual violence in countries such as PNG.
Keyword Women
Gender violence
Sexual violence
Men's perceptions
Papua New Guinea
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 02 Jun 2016, 20:51:00 EST by Lee Wilson on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies