Neighborhood disadvantage, individual-level socioeconomic position and physical function: A cross-sectional multilevel analysis

Loh, Venurs Hui Yee, Rachele, Jerome N., Brown, Wendy J., Washington, Simon and Turrell, Gavin (2016) Neighborhood disadvantage, individual-level socioeconomic position and physical function: A cross-sectional multilevel analysis. Preventive Medicine, 89 112-120. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.05.007


Author Loh, Venurs Hui Yee
Rachele, Jerome N.
Brown, Wendy J.
Washington, Simon
Turrell, Gavin
Title Neighborhood disadvantage, individual-level socioeconomic position and physical function: A cross-sectional multilevel analysis
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.05.007
Volume 89
Start page 112
End page 120
Total pages 28
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction
Understanding associations between physical function and neighborhood disadvantage may provide insights into which interventions might best contribute to reducing socioeconomic inequalities in health. This study examines associations between neighborhood-disadvantage, individual-level socioeconomic position (SEP) and physical function from a multilevel perspective.

Methods
Data were obtained from the HABITAT multilevel longitudinal (2007-13) study of middle-aged adults, using data from the fourth wave (2013). This investigation included 6004 residents (age 46–71 years) of 535 neighborhoods in Brisbane, Australia. Physical function was measured using the PF-10 (0–100), with higher scores indicating better function. The data were analyzed using multilevel linear regression and were extended to test for cross-level interactions by including interaction terms for different combinations of SEP (education, occupation, household income) and neighborhood disadvantage on physical function.

Results
Residents of the most disadvantaged neighborhoods had significantly lower function (men: β − 11.36 95% CI − 13.74, − 8.99; women: β − 11.41 95% CI − 13.60, − 9.22). These associations remained after adjustment for individual-level SEP. Individuals with no post-school education, those permanently unable to work, and members of the lowest household income had significantly poorer physical function. Cross-level interactions suggested that the relationship between household income and physical function is different across levels of neighborhood disadvantage for men; and for education and occupation for women.

Conclusion

Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood was negatively associated with physical function after adjustment for individual-level SEP. These results may assist in the development of policy-relevant targeted interventions to delay the rate of physical function decline at a community-level.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 01 Jun 2016, 11:11:32 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences