The influence of experiential learning in preparing future planners to be flexible, responsive and innovative

Rosier, J, Slade, C, Perkins, Tim, Baldwin, C, Coiacetto, Eddo, Budge, Trevor, Harwood, Andrew and La Vache, Ari (2014). The influence of experiential learning in preparing future planners to be flexible, responsive and innovative. In: Association of Euroepan Schools of Planning Annual Conference 2014 (AESOP), Utrecht/Delft, Netherlands, (145-146). 9-12 July, 2014.

Author Rosier, J
Slade, C
Perkins, Tim
Baldwin, C
Coiacetto, Eddo
Budge, Trevor
Harwood, Andrew
La Vache, Ari
Title of paper The influence of experiential learning in preparing future planners to be flexible, responsive and innovative
Conference name Association of Euroepan Schools of Planning Annual Conference 2014 (AESOP)
Conference location Utrecht/Delft, Netherlands
Conference dates 9-12 July, 2014
Publisher Association of European Schools of Planning
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Published abstract
Start page 145
End page 146
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The researchers have envisioned a future planning world in which all kinds of people are involved in planning and a wide range of tools including plans are needed to develop more participatory approaches to planning issues. The education of planners becomes important in delivering this change, with student planners being trained to be flexible, responsive and innovative in choosing tools to deal with urban issues. In this paper, the authors advocate an experiential learning approach to planning education and present the findings of a nationally funded Australian research project which enabled planning academics across five university planning programs to develop a range of planning education experiences that meet theoretical principles of best practice in experiential learning. The research project culminated in the development of an experiential planning website, which provides resources and examples for use by other planning academics when involving the wider community and other specialists in education of planners. It is hoped that other planning academics will contribute to this website over time. Currently, the types of professional knowledge sought by practitioners in employing planning graduates, are moderated by the academic control of curriculum (e.g. research based teaching), and institutional tertiary education requirements. The knowledge gained through experiential and work-based learning and other variations, and its input to academic knowledge and curriculum may be blurred and under-valued. It is argued in this paper that the boundaries between academic and professional knowledge and skills should be further blurred. We argue that a more systematic approach to integrating experiential learning to teaching and learning in planning academic programs would strengthen curriculum and provide a vehicle for further partnerships and dialogues with local practitioners and other specialists involved in planning with communities. 
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes http://www.aesop2014.eu/

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 31 May 2016, 12:21:04 EST by Sandra Hartas on behalf of Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation