A discrete role for FNR in the transcriptional response to moderate changes in oxygen by Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20

Jiang, Donald, Tikhomirova, Alexandra, Bent, Stephen J. and Kidd, Stephen P. (2016) A discrete role for FNR in the transcriptional response to moderate changes in oxygen by Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20. Research in Microbiology, 167 2: 103-113. doi:10.1016/j.resmic.2015.09.008


Author Jiang, Donald
Tikhomirova, Alexandra
Bent, Stephen J.
Kidd, Stephen P.
Title A discrete role for FNR in the transcriptional response to moderate changes in oxygen by Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20
Formatted title
A discrete role for FNR in the transcriptional response to moderate changes in oxygen by Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20
Journal name Research in Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1769-7123
0923-2508
Publication date 2016-02
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.resmic.2015.09.008
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 167
Issue 2
Start page 103
End page 113
Total pages 11
Place of publication Issy les Moulineaux, France
Publisher Elsevier Masson
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The survival by pathogenic bacteria within the specific conditions of an anatomical niche is critical for their persistence. These conditions include the combination of toxic chemicals, such as reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), with factors relevant to cell growth, such as oxygen. Haemophilus influenzae senses oxygen levels largely through the redox state of the intracellular fumarate-nitrate global regulator (FNR). H. influenzae certainly encounters oxygen levels that fluctuate, but in reality, these would rarely reach a state that results in FNR being fully reduced or oxidized. We were therefore interested in the response of H. influenzae to ROS and RNS at moderately high or low oxygen levels and the corresponding role of FNR. At these levels of oxygen, even though the growth rate of an H. influenzae fnr mutant was similar to wild type, its ROS and RNS tolerance was significantly different. Additionally, the subtle changes in oxygen did alter the whole cell transcriptional profile and this was different between the wild type and fnr mutant strains. It was the changed whole cell profile that impacted on ROS/RNS defence, but surprisingly, the FNR-regulated, anaerobic nitrite reductase (NrfA) continued to be expressed and had a role in this phenotype.
Keyword Aerobic/anaerobic
FNR
Haemophilus influenza
Oxidative stress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 31 May 2016, 11:16:51 EST by Stephen Bent on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)