Phylogeny of beak and feather disease virus in cockatoos demonstrates host generalism and multiple-variant infections within Psittaciformes

Sarker, Subir, Ghorashi, Seyed A., Forwood, Jade K., Bent, Stephen J., Peters, Andrew and Raidal, Shane R. (2014) Phylogeny of beak and feather disease virus in cockatoos demonstrates host generalism and multiple-variant infections within Psittaciformes. Virology, 460-461 72-82. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2014.04.021


Author Sarker, Subir
Ghorashi, Seyed A.
Forwood, Jade K.
Bent, Stephen J.
Peters, Andrew
Raidal, Shane R.
Title Phylogeny of beak and feather disease virus in cockatoos demonstrates host generalism and multiple-variant infections within Psittaciformes
Formatted title
Phylogeny of beak and feather disease virus in cockatoos demonstrates host generalism and multiple-variant infections within Psittaciformes
Journal name Virology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1096-0341
0042-6822
Publication date 2014-07
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.virol.2014.04.021
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 460-461
Start page 72
End page 82
Total pages 11
Place of publication Waltham, MA, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Phylogenetic analyses of the highly genetically diverse but antigenically conserved, single-stranded circular, DNA genome of the avian circovirus, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) from cockatoo species throughout Australia demonstrated a high mutation rate for BFDV (orders of magnitude fall in the range of 10-4 substitutions/site/year) along with strong support for recombination indicating active cross-species transmission in various subpopulations. Multiple variants of BFDV were demonstrated with at least 30 genotypic variants identified within nine individual birds, with one containing up to 7 variants. Single genetic variants were detected in feathers from 2 birds but splenic tissue provided further variants. The rich BFDV genetic diversity points to Australasia as the most likely geographical origin of this virus and supports flexible host switching. We propose this as evidence of Order-wide host generalism in the Psittaciformes characterised by high mutability that is buffered by frequent recombination and slow replication strategy.
Keyword Circovirus
Host generalism
Host switching
Multiple-variants
Mutation rate
Psittacine beak and feather disease
Viral quasispecies
Viral recombination
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 31 May 2016, 11:12:52 EST by Stephen Bent on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)