Chlorophyll-deficient propagules of Avicennia marina and apparent longer term deterioration of mangrove fitness in oil-polluted sediments

Duke, Norman C. and Watkinson, Andrew J. (2002) Chlorophyll-deficient propagules of Avicennia marina and apparent longer term deterioration of mangrove fitness in oil-polluted sediments. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 44 11: 1269-1276. doi:10.1016/S0025-326X(02)00221-7


Author Duke, Norman C.
Watkinson, Andrew J.
Title Chlorophyll-deficient propagules of Avicennia marina and apparent longer term deterioration of mangrove fitness in oil-polluted sediments
Formatted title
Chlorophyll-deficient propagules of Avicennia marina and apparent longer term deterioration of mangrove fitness in oil-polluted sediments
Journal name Marine Pollution Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-326X
1879-3363
Publication date 2002-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0025-326X(02)00221-7
Volume 44
Issue 11
Start page 1269
End page 1276
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, U.K
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 05 Environmental Sciences
Formatted abstract
A correlation between petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and chlorophyll-deficient mutations in mangroves may occur also in Australian mangroves. Earlier reports of such mutations in the Caribbean area were evident in viviparous propagules of the common mangrove genera, Rhizophora, borne on otherwise normal trees. These mutant propagules were termed ‘albinos’ since they lacked chlorophyll and normal green coloration, leaving them white, yellow or red. The mutation was considered lethal since newly established albino seedlings appeared unable to survive more than a few months. Our preliminary investigation of mangroves in SE Queensland found a similar mutation in another common mangrove genus, Avicennia, and this was apparently also correlated with oil concentrations in sediments. Although, more evidence is required, an apparently similar relationship shows that whatever caused the mutations may act commonly across a diverse range of plant types in quite separate locations. How widespread might this mutation be in mangroves? How many genera and species are affected? Are all occurrences correlated with oil in sediments? Does oil cause the mutation? We discuss these important questions and the potentially serious implications to coastal management where high mutant densities may be indicative of longer term genetic deterioration of mangrove habitat in oil-polluted wetland environments.
© 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Environmental Sciences
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Mangrove
Avicennia marina
Oil
Pollution
Albino
Mutation
Queensland
Spontaneous mutation-rates
Petroleum pollution
Spills
Ecosystems
Seedlings
Genetics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 23:18:57 EST