Determinants of domestic violence against women in Ghana

Adjah, Ebenezer S. Owusu and Agbemafle, Isaac (2016) Determinants of domestic violence against women in Ghana. BMC Public Health, 16 1-9. doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3041-x


Author Adjah, Ebenezer S. Owusu
Agbemafle, Isaac
Title Determinants of domestic violence against women in Ghana
Journal name BMC Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2458
Publication date 2016-05-02
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3041-x
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 16
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
The prevalence of domestic violence remains unacceptably high with numerous consequences ranging from psychological to maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity outcomes in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to identify factors that increased the likelihood of an event of domestic violence as reported by ever married Ghanaian women.

Methods
Data from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS) was analysed using a multivariate logistic model and risk factors were obtained using the forward selection procedure.

Results
Of the 1524 ever married women in this study, 33.6 % had ever experienced domestic violence. The risk of ever experiencing domestic violence was 35 % for women who reside in urban areas. Risk of domestic violence was 41 % higher for women whose husbands ever experienced their father beating their mother. Women whose mother ever beat their father were three times more likely to experience domestic violence as compared to women whose mother did not beat their father. The risk of ever experiencing domestic violence was 48 % less likely for women whose husbands had higher than secondary education as compared to women whose husbands never had any formal education. Women whose husbands drink alcohol were 2.5 times more likely to experience domestic violence as compared to women whose husbands do not drink alcohol.

Conclusion
Place of residence, alcohol use by husband and family history of violence do increase a woman’s risk of ever experiencing domestic violence. Higher than secondary education acted as a protective buffer against domestic violence. Domestic violence against women is still persistent and greater efforts should be channelled into curtailing it by using a multi-stakeholder approach and enforcing stricter punishments to perpetrators.
Keyword Domestic violence
Ghana
Woman
Men
Risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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