Prevalence of bacteriuria in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract infection presenting for elective surgical procedures

McGhie, J. A., Stayt, J. and Hosgood, G. L. (2014) Prevalence of bacteriuria in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract infection presenting for elective surgical procedures. Australian Veterinary Journal, 92 1-2: 33-37. doi:10.1111/avj.12140


Author McGhie, J. A.
Stayt, J.
Hosgood, G. L.
Title Prevalence of bacteriuria in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract infection presenting for elective surgical procedures
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
1751-0813
Publication date 2014-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/avj.12140
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 92
Issue 1-2
Start page 33
End page 37
Total pages 5
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To determine the frequency of bacteriuria in dogs presenting for elective surgery, to compare the frequency of bacteriuria in dogs presenting for orthopaedic (non-neurological) procedures to that of dogs presenting for soft tissue procedures and to measure the agreement of microscopic visualisation of bacteria in urine sediment with the occurrence of bacterial growth on culture.

Methods: Prospective cohort study of 140 client-owned dogs. Urine was collected via prepubic cystocentesis prior to or immediately after induction of anaesthesia. Urine was submitted for quantitative bacteriological culture and urinalysis. The dogs' age, sex, weight and breed were recorded, as well as the surgical procedure performed.

Results: In total, 80 orthopaedic and 60 soft tissue surgical cases were included in the study; 3 dogs (2.1%) returned bacterial growth on culture (positive urine culture) and 19 (13.6%) recorded urine sediment with pyuria and/or bacteriuria on urinalysis (positive urinalysis). All dogs with positive urine culture were female and two of them underwent orthopaedic procedures. Each bitch had growth of Escherichia coli >105CFU/mL. The agreement between positive urinalysis and positive urine culture was poor (κ = 0.15).

Conclusions: The prevalence of bacteriuria in dogs without clinical signs of urinary tract infection in this population was low (2.1%). An at-risk population could not be identified because of the small number of positive outcomes. A positive urinalysis showed poor agreement with urine culture results and therefore the decision to treat without performing a urine culture is not advised.
Keyword Bacteriuria
Dogs
Pyuria
Surgery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 27 May 2016, 11:06:27 EST by Jayne Mcghie on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)