Emic conceptualisations of (im)politeness and face in Japanese: implications for the discursive negotiation of second language learner identities

Haugh, Michael (2007) Emic conceptualisations of (im)politeness and face in Japanese: implications for the discursive negotiation of second language learner identities. Journal of Pragmatics, 39 4: 657-680. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2006.12.005


Author Haugh, Michael
Title Emic conceptualisations of (im)politeness and face in Japanese: implications for the discursive negotiation of second language learner identities
Journal name Journal of Pragmatics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-2166
Publication date 2007-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pragma.2006.12.005
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 39
Issue 4
Start page 657
End page 680
Total pages 24
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Learners of languages often face various dilemmas in relation to their identities in that language. In this paper, it is argued that if learners of Japanese are to learn how to successfully manage these various dilemmas, they need to acquire a more emically-grounding understanding of the various dimensions that can influence or be influenced by their second language identities. Two phenomena that have received only mention in passing in relation to the discursive negotiation of identities thus far are ‘(im)politeness’ and ‘face’. An emic analysis reveals the pivotal role occupied by place in the interactional achievement of ‘(im)politeness’ and ‘face’ in Japanese. It is thus proposed that the discursive accomplishment of identities is reflexively indexed through ‘place’ to the interactional achievement of ‘(im)politeness’ and ‘face’. This approach is forwarded in an attempt to offer greater clarity in explicating the manner in which discursive dispute over the respective ‘places’ of interactants can impact upon the negotiation of identities in intercultural conversation. In this way, learners of Japanese may become more empowered in their attempts to manage their second language identities.
Keyword Politeness
Face
Identity
Emic
Interactional achievement
Japanese
Second language learner
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 May 2016, 11:52:19 EST by Ms Katrina Hume on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures