Engaging, supporting and retaining academic at-risk students in a Bachelor of Nursing: setting risk markers, interventions and outcomes.

Tower, Marion, Walker, Rachel, Wilson, Keithia, Watson, Bernadette and Tronoff, Glenyss (2015) Engaging, supporting and retaining academic at-risk students in a Bachelor of Nursing: setting risk markers, interventions and outcomes.. International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 6 1: 121-134. doi:10.5204/intjfyhe.v6i1.251


Author Tower, Marion
Walker, Rachel
Wilson, Keithia
Watson, Bernadette
Tronoff, Glenyss
Title Engaging, supporting and retaining academic at-risk students in a Bachelor of Nursing: setting risk markers, interventions and outcomes.
Journal name International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1838-2959
Publication date 2015-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5204/intjfyhe.v6i1.251
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 1
Start page 121
End page 134
Total pages 14
Place of publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Student attrition from nursing programs impacts on sustainability of the profession. Factors associated with attrition include: lack of academic capital, extracurricular responsibilities, first generation tertiary students, and low socio-economic or traditionally underrepresented cultural background. Successful Australian government reforms designed to advance equity in higher education have increased student population diversity, which is accompanied by a rise in the incidence of risk factors for attrition (Benson, Heagney, Hewitt, Crosling, & Devos, 2013).This prospective study examined commencing nursing students in their first semester to track critical risk markers associated with attrition, and implemented timely interventions to support subject completion or enrolment perseverance in the event of subject failure. Students who attended orientation, accessed blended learning, attended early tutorials, submitted and passed first assessment items, and studied part-time were significantly more likely to pass the subject overall. Interventions based on good practice principles for student engagement and support resulted in increased retention.
Keyword Retention
Student adjustment
Academic at-risk students
Academic success
Drop out
Academic engagement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 20 May 2016, 15:33:27 EST by Bernadette Watson on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work