Working with families in community services: multidisciplinary perceptions of working with children and their parents

Smyth, Wendy, Kruze, Rose, Al Mamun, Abdullah, White, Andrew and Shields, Linda (2016) Working with families in community services: multidisciplinary perceptions of working with children and their parents. Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing, 19 1: 18-23.

Author Smyth, Wendy
Kruze, Rose
Al Mamun, Abdullah
White, Andrew
Shields, Linda
Title Working with families in community services: multidisciplinary perceptions of working with children and their parents
Journal name Neonatal, Paediatric and Child Health Nursing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1441-6638
Publication date 2016-03-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 18
End page 23
Total pages 6
Place of publication West Leederville, WA, Australia
Publisher Cambridge Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Family-centred care is well known in community child health, but in previous studies, staff in acute paediatrics felt more positive about working with children than with parents.

Aims: To test perceptions of health professionals in community child health, about working with children and parents.

Methods: Forty-eight community child health staff in regional Australia completed the "Working with Families" questionnaire.

Findings: Mean scores (1 lowest-5 highest): working with children: 4.29 (CI 4.06, 4.51); with parents 3.90 (CI 3.68, 4.12); mean difference-0.39 (CI-0.54, 0.23; p<0.001). No significant relationship occurred between scores and demographics.

Discussion: Staff in this small sample were more positive about working with children than working with parents. People work in child health because they like children, but if family-centred care was effectively implemented no such difference would occur. Implications for practice: Staff in community child health require support and education about family-centred care.

Conclusion: Family-centred care is the cornerstone of community child health. Staff in this small sample were more positive about working with children than parents, suggesting problems with its implementation. Improvements are required in how health professionals perceive their role in supporting and caring for children and families to achieve family-centred care. This study needs replication with a larger sample.
Keyword Child health
Children
Community
Family-centred care
Paediatrics
Parents
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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