The relationship between trait mindfulness, personality and psychological distress: a revised reinforcement sensitivity theory perspective

Harnett, Paul H., Reid, Natasha, Loxton, Natalie J. and Lee, Nick (2016) The relationship between trait mindfulness, personality and psychological distress: a revised reinforcement sensitivity theory perspective. Personality and Individual Differences, 99 100-105. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2016.04.085


Author Harnett, Paul H.
Reid, Natasha
Loxton, Natalie J.
Lee, Nick
Title The relationship between trait mindfulness, personality and psychological distress: a revised reinforcement sensitivity theory perspective
Journal name Personality and Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2016.04.085
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 99
Start page 100
End page 105
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Interest in the application of mindfulness-based intervention for the treatment of psychological disorders and promotion of wellbeing has grown exponentially in recent years. Mindfulness-based interventions have been found to be beneficial for treatment of various forms of psychopathology as well as improve psychological wellbeing and enhance physical health. Little research has investigated for whom and under what conditions training people to use mindfulness-based therapeutic techniques is most effective. Recent studies have found evidence that individual differences in personality traits are associated with mindfulness. For example, neuroticism has been found to be negatively associated with mindfulness. These associations raise the possibility that individual differences in personality may potentially moderate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions. In the present study we draw on Gray's revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (r-RST) to examine relationships between personality traits, mindfulness and psychological distress. We found that the Flight, Fight, Freeze system mediated the relationship between trait mindfulness and psychological distress, while trait mindfulness moderated the relationship between the Flight, Fight, Freeze system and psychological distress. Both results are consistent with the suggestion that acquiring the skills from learning and practicing mindfulness techniques is potentially useful, particularly for threat-sensitive individuals with low to moderate levels of trait mindfulness.
Keyword Mindfulness
Personality
Psychological distress
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 17 May 2016, 00:12:46 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)