Comparison of burrowing and stimuli-evoked pain behaviors as end-points in rat models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain

Muralidharan, Arjun, Kuo, Andy, Jacob, Meera, Lourdesamy, Jacintha S., Melo Sores Pinho De Carvalho, Lara, Nicholson, Janet R., Corradini, Laura and Smith, Maree T. (2016) Comparison of burrowing and stimuli-evoked pain behaviors as end-points in rat models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 10 88: . doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00088


Author Muralidharan, Arjun
Kuo, Andy
Jacob, Meera
Lourdesamy, Jacintha S.
Melo Sores Pinho De Carvalho, Lara
Nicholson, Janet R.
Corradini, Laura
Smith, Maree T.
Title Comparison of burrowing and stimuli-evoked pain behaviors as end-points in rat models of inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain
Journal name Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1662-5153
Publication date 2016-05-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00088
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 88
Total pages 9
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Establishment and validation of ethologically-relevant, non-evoked behavioral end-points as surrogate measures of spontaneous pain in rodent pain models has been proposed as a means to improve preclinical to clinical research translation in the pain field. Here, we compared the utility of burrowing behavior with hypersensitivity to applied mechanical stimuli for pain assessment in rat models of chronic inflammatory and peripheral neuropathic pain. Briefly, groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated to the burrowing environment and trained over a 5-day period. Rats that burrowed ≤ 450 g of gravel on any 2 days of the individual training phase were excluded from the study. The remaining rats received either a unilateral intraplantar injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) or saline, or underwent unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve- or sham-surgery. Baseline burrowing behavior and evoked pain behaviors were assessed prior to model induction, and twice-weekly until study completion on day 14. For FCA- and CCI-rats, but not the corresponding groups of sham-rats, evoked mechanical hypersensitivity developed in a temporal manner in the ipsilateral hindpaws. Although burrowing behavior also decreased in a temporal manner for both FCA-and CCI- rats, there was considerable inter-animal variability. By contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral hindpaws of FCA- and CCI-rats respectively, exhibited minimal inter-animal variability. Our data collectively show that burrowing behavior is altered in rodent models of chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. However, large group sizes are needed to ensure studies are adequately powered due to considerable inter-animal variability.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Pharmacy Publications
Centre for Integrated Preclinical Drug Development Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 11 May 2016, 09:35:47 EST by Andy Kuo on behalf of Centre for Integrated Preclinical Drug Development