What clinical features precede the onset of bipolar disorder?

Perich, Tania, Lau, Phoebe, Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan, Roberts, Gloria, Frankland, Andrew, Wright, Adam, Green, Melissa, Breakspear, Michael, Corry, Justine, Radlinska, Basia, McCormack, Clare, Joslyn, Cassandra, Levy, Florence, Lenroot, Rhoshel, Nurnberger Jnr, John I. and Mitchell, Philip B. (2015) What clinical features precede the onset of bipolar disorder?. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 62 71-77. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.01.017

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Author Perich, Tania
Lau, Phoebe
Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan
Roberts, Gloria
Frankland, Andrew
Wright, Adam
Green, Melissa
Breakspear, Michael
Corry, Justine
Radlinska, Basia
McCormack, Clare
Joslyn, Cassandra
Levy, Florence
Lenroot, Rhoshel
Nurnberger Jnr, John I.
Mitchell, Philip B.
Title What clinical features precede the onset of bipolar disorder?
Journal name Journal of Psychiatric Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1379
0022-3956
Publication date 2015-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.01.017
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 62
Start page 71
End page 77
Total pages 7
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Abstract Despite a growing number of reports, there is still limited knowledge of the clinical features that precede the onset of bipolar disorder (BD). To explore this, we investigated baseline data from a prospectively evaluated longitudinal cohort of subjects aged 12-30 years to compare: first, lifetime rates of clinical features between a) subjects at increased genetic risk for developing BD ('AR'), b) participants from families without mental illness ('controls'), and c) those with established BD; and, second, prior clinical features that predict the later onset of affective disorders in these same three groups. This is the first study to report such comparisons between these three groups (though certainly not the first to compare AR and control samples). 118 AR participants with a parent or sibling with BD (including 102 with a BD parent), 110 controls, and 44 BD subjects were assessed using semi-structured interviews. AR subjects had significantly increased lifetime risks for depressive, anxiety and behavioural disorders compared to controls. Unlike prior reports, preceding anxiety and behavioural disorders were not found to increase risk for later onset of affective disorders in the AR sample, perhaps due to limited sample size. However, preceding behavioural disorders did predict later onset of affective disorders in the BD sample. The findings that i) AR subjects had higher rates of depressive, anxiety and behavioural disorders compared to controls, and ii) prior behavioural disorders increased the risk to later development of affective disorders in the BD group, suggest the possibility of therapeutic targeting for these disorders in those at high genetic risk for BD. •Those at high genetic risk for bipolar disorder had significantly increased lifetime risks for depressive, anxiety and behavioural disorders.
Keyword Adolescent
At risk
Bipolar disorder
Genetic
High risk
Psychopathology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 May 2016, 11:19:34 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)