Using insights from animal behaviour and behavioural ecology to inform marine conservation initiatives

Brooker, Rohan M., Feeney, William E., White, James R., Manassa, Rachel P., Johansen, Jacob L. and Dixson, Danielle L. (2016) Using insights from animal behaviour and behavioural ecology to inform marine conservation initiatives. Animal Behaviour, . doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.012


Author Brooker, Rohan M.
Feeney, William E.
White, James R.
Manassa, Rachel P.
Johansen, Jacob L.
Dixson, Danielle L.
Title Using insights from animal behaviour and behavioural ecology to inform marine conservation initiatives
Journal name Animal Behaviour   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-3472
1095-8282
Publication date 2016-04-29
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.03.012
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract The impacts of human activities on the natural world are becoming increasingly apparent, with rapid development and exploitation occurring at the expense of habitat quality and biodiversity. Declines are especially concerning in the oceans, which hold intrinsic value due to their biological uniqueness as well as their substantial sociological and economic importance. Here, we review the literature and investigate whether incorporation of knowledge from the fields of animal behaviour and behavioural ecology may improve the effectiveness of conservation initiatives in marine systems. In particular, we consider (1) how knowledge of larval behaviour and ecology may be used to inform the design of marine protected areas, (2) how protecting species that hold specific ecological niches may be of particular importance for maximizing the preservation of biodiversity, (3) how current harvesting techniques may be inadvertently skewing the behavioural phenotypes of stock populations and whether changes to current practices may lessen this skew and reinforce population persistence, and (4) how understanding the behavioural and physiological responses of species to a changing environment may provide essential insights into areas of particular vulnerability for prioritized conservation attention. The complex nature of conservation programmes inherently results in interdisciplinary responses, and the incorporation of knowledge from the fields of animal behaviour and behavioural ecology may increase our ability to stem the loss of biodiversity in marine environments.
Keyword Behaviour
Conservation
Coral reef
Fisheries
Larval dispersal
Marine protected area
Personality
Physiological tolerance
Specialization
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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